Waverley Camera Club

Author Archive

Knox Black and White – Wednesday 25th July

by on Jul.25, 2012, under Competitions

Please come along and support your club at the Annual Knox B&W Interclub Competition, last year we had so many members attend that we outnumbered the Knox members. Our entries to the competition can be found HERE

When:       Wednesday 25th July 2012
Where:      Boronia West Primary School, Tormore Road, Boronia
(Melway Map Ref. 64 J8) opposite Knox Swim Centre
Time:         7.45pm

Come along and support our Club and enjoy the nice supper which is provided after the judging.

Thanks,

Donna Clarke

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A Sunday at Walhalla

by on May.01, 2011, under Outings

Ten of us enjoyed the day at Walhalla. We met a larger turnout from the East Gippsland Photographic Society, helped them with a group photo, and then dispersed and drifted and bumped into each other taking photos through the town.

Group Photo WCC Style by Fred Bullock

There were autumn leaves, the bandstand, the fire station on a bridge, the old church, and the old strongroom which saw 76 tons of gold go by. There were pretty cottages, some larger new B&Bs, and there are some reasonably authentic restored buildings. And electricity!

Lunch was in an excellent cafe (good pies, good coffee, good people). The after lunch option was a visit to the mountainside cemetery, and a train ride down and back through Stringers Gorge.

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Cranbourne Rodeo details: Saturday 29th Jan

by on Jan.24, 2011, under Outings

Hi all, here is some more information on Saturday’s club outing. Judging from the facts below, it’s a ‘must see’ event. The event opens at 4:30pm with the Rodeo starting around 6:30pm.

Location:
1450 Ballarto Rd, Clyde.

Date:
29 Jan 2011, Open from 4.30pm to 1am

Admission:
Family $60
Adult $25
5 – 16 years old $15
Under 5 – Free

The Facts:
– It’s the biggest Victorian rodeo of the year with 10-15,000 people.
– Full line up of rodeo events as well as live music, amusement rides and dirt bike riding.
– Any excuse to wear a cowboy outfit!
– Rodeos are great fun and rarely so close to Melbourne

Map:

View Larger Map

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Proposed Restaurant Dinner – Tues 21st September

by on Aug.10, 2010, under Outings

For something different Andy Armitage and myself have proposed a restaurant dinner of Sri Lankan cuisine at Curry and Chips (I don’t think they actually sell chips) It  is very authentic (I have eaten there a few times before) and is located in Mt Waverley at 250 Blackburn Rd (Syndal)

The restaurant owners are willing to open exclusively for us on a Tuesday night however we do need a minimum number in attendance, so please feel free to optionally bring any family, friends or partners.

The menu can be customised to our liking, along with some ‘show-cooking’ at the table and should come to between $10 to $20 per person (drinks extra)

If we can get the numbers it promises to be a good night (and we will try to incorporate a slide show or photo viewing into the night as well) We will be sending another email in the next week to confirm final numbers attending, for hopefully, a tuesday night.

RSVP with us ASAP if you will be coming along.

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A beauty-full night at the Portrait & Flash Group

by on Jul.31, 2010, under Special interest groups

On Wednesday night members of the Portrait & Flash Group were able to put previously learned portrait and flash theory into practise with some dedicated subjects. Thanks to Teddy Tan, we were graced with three models: Cassie, Jodie and Monica who were all very comfortable at the other side of the camera lens.


Anyone who has ever been in front of a camera at a portrait workshop will know it’s definitely not as easy as it looks, but these women were in their element and made it look so easy (even with limited directing.)

With the Knox Interclub being held on the same night, we were a few members down from past nights but  with a few newbies coming along, there was a cosey ratio of models to photographers.

A special thanks to Cassie, Jodie, Monica and Ted for making the night a success.

The WCC Portrait & Flash Group is held on the fourth Wednesday of the month at 7:30pm. New members are welcome!

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A fun night of sound-triggered flash photos

by on Jul.22, 2010, under Workshops

Wadham House resembled a packed media conference at Tuesday night’s sound-triggered flash workshop. After everyone had set up their camera gear, the night started off with a bang.

With Stephen Edmonds on props, Pete Davies at the light switch and some generous supplies from some forward-thinking members, many party-poppers were detonated at various angles and millisecond delay settings; no single one popped the same: some fizzled, a few backfired onto Stephen’s fingers, some hit Dave Sumner in the head – entertainment on its own! Using the club’s sound triggered flash system (built by Craig Terry), in a dark room with about 15 open camera shutters, those attending got the opportunity to photograph some unique action,especially towards the end of the night when positioning and timing of the flash had been perfected.

Some more members brought a few [increasingly rare] tungsten lightbulbs to smash up with a metal wrench (these glass bulbs proved surprisingly difficult to shatter!) Keeping to the pyrotechnic flavour of the night, the workshop finale involved an exploding apple that had to be seen to be believed.

A fun night of photography and many a laugh was shared between club members for another highly successful WCC workshop.

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Member Spotlight: Dennis Creasy

by on Jul.09, 2010, under General

It’s been a while but we are pleased to debut another WCC Member biography on Dennis Creasy.  Stay tunned for another Member Spotlight in the coming months.

Dennis Eric Creasy, 1931 – 201ish or so

Born in London, Dennis was one of a very rare vintage: 1931 was the year of the lowest birth rate ever recorded in both Britain and Australia. Surviving 250kg aliquots of HE, V1s and V2s he was finally bequeathed his mother’s Box Brownie during his last years of schooling. Hard economics set in: two rolls of “120” film = 16 exposures of 2¼ x 3¼ = One week’s pocket money. Fortunately his father was an amateur photographer so he learnt early to do his own processing (in open dishes) with the cost of chemicals “on the firm”. Developing tanks were unheard of in his household.

With his second roll of film he cycled down to his old haunt where he had been a war time evacuee for a while and photographed the old Saxon church near Didling, W. Sussex, at the foot of the South Downs.

This was a church noted for having kept its head down and hence was overlooked during Henry VIII’s gold grab of 1536 to finance his many girlfriends. This effectively destroyed any vague interest Dennis may have had for bricks and mortar but not for girlfriends.

Ten years later his father bequeathed to him his “620” Kodak folding camera. Frustrated by this continued “large” format being wished on him while “everyone” else had 35mm he opened it up and glued a mask inside to give 16 half size negatives. Consequently he then had to build an enlarger.

Another decade rolled by and, in spite of the cold war, Russian cameras were in the shops. Now he had a wife, a mortgage and money in the bank! Gentlemen, he advised, should always marry a rich woman. So he splashed out on a “Zenith E”: 35mm and colour prints at last!

The “E” saw him through the next 1½ decades and into Australia. But by now Anno Domini had caught up with him and his arms had grown too short for him to be able to read his slide-rule (Slide-rule? What the hell’s that?) let alone focus his camera.

Fortunately for his coronary and blood pressure, autofocus widgets were appearing in the shops and in 1986 a quick trip back to Britain facilitated the duty free acquisition of an autofocus Minolta 7000 and extra lenses. Right up until the death of film, the 7000 never gave him the slightest trouble.

Being an old fashioned “see the wheels go round” engineer, Dennis did not welcome the advent of the digital age. So much so that he retired early to avoid having to use the ghastly electronic widget with which his employer insisted on decorating his desk. Rumour has it that he was latterly in possession of some form of digital Sony gadget which enabled him to use his 7000 lenses. However, he professed to the very end that until he had confined the progeny of his 1469 rolls of film safely into albums he had no intention of getting involved with “all this new fangled digitry”.

In order to preserve a level of insanity he took up playing cards and also became a rowing coach.

In mid 1992 a portrait of WCC then President, Marcia Brown, appeared in the local rag and he immediately applied to join the club. By 1996 he had graduated to Club secretary and also succeeded Christine Anfried as Newsletter editor for several years (with the able assistance of Prue McColl) In 2005 the WCC held an exhibition at the Highway Gallery and beside his two offerings was Epitaph 1:

“Dennis Creasy is a retiring retired engineer. He is very selfish and takes snaps purely for his own personal erotic pleasure with no interest whatever in what others may think. Those who view his images must be prepared to put their own brains into gear if they wish to get anything out of them”.

Eventually he joined that noble band of A Graders. Not, he would hasten to point out, because he was a good photographer but because, like any devious student, he read the (then) rules and then religiously applied them. His mental state declined as he lamented the mutation of the Newsletter to the Blog and he appeared not to have had a remission. He had always hoped that one day he would have had his own private studio in his home and taken pictures of women which they would one day have been proud to show to their grand-daughters.

“The report of his death was an exaggeration” (with apologies to M. Twain) but he will leave a wife, four children and ten grandchildren.

Epitaph 2: “Come back hard copy; all is forgiven!”

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Another successful monthly workshop

by on May.19, 2010, under Workshops

Another successful monthly workshop got underway on Tuesday night with a steady crowd of around 20 members keen to brush up their skills or share advice for still life photography. The kitchen theme saw a variety of objects to capture.

A highlight of the night was Leif Anderson’s demonstration of his polarised light box, where plastic objects were lit and photographed through polarised filters with colourful effect.

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A great day at Moorabbin Air Museum

by on May.03, 2010, under Outings

A bit after 12 noon a modest turnout of Stephen Edmonds, John Hadfield and myself met at the Sandbelt Hotel for a leisurely Sunday lunch. Arriving at the museum around 1:30pm, WCC attendance doubled upon us meeting Leif, Natalie and Dale.

Despite an overcast day and some challenging shooting conditions inside the large dark hangar, there were many photo opportunities for those with an off-camera flash – jet turbines, piston engines, a fighter jet and more; while outside were several large commercial aircraft on display; 25 in total.

Putting claustrophobia in her stride, Dale got some exclusive cockpit time at the controls of some historic wartime flying machines while Stephen, John, Natalie and myself tinkered about and discussed the workings of a jet engine on display.

An enjoyable and interesting day was had by all.

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Member of the Month: Ron Weatherhead

by on Sep.14, 2009, under General

My apologies for the lack of the Member of the Month article, moving house made this quite difficult. This month the article focusses on a long standing member and current Secretary, Ron Weatherhead.

Self Portrait

We moved to Australia, with two young children, 25 years ago, having lived in England, Nigeria and Barbados. I taught Mathematics and later became an Actuary, but am now retired. I have been coming to Wadham House on the 1st and 3rd Tuesday since 1992. Photography had long been an interest, but it only became a real hobby after I joined the club. The club’s beginners’ course taught me B&W processing, and I spent hours in my blacked-out laundry trying to make images that were good enough for competitions. Not many were winners in those early years. The club was run by a small committed group and I did not contribute much until I took on the job of secretary. The newsletter editor role was added and I also wrote a monthly article for our local newspaper article featuring the winning competition shots.

Q. What sort of equipment you use and what you would like to own in an ideal world?

My first SLR was a Praktica, a good affordable camera made in the (former) East Germany. I got a Nikon F601 when I joined the club, then moved on to a Nikon D80. I use the 18-135mm kit lens, which does not have good reviews, but gets reasonable images with the help of Photoshop. I don’t really crave any fancy equipment, but would have liked the VR Nikon 18-200mm lens, but it was not available at the time.

Q. What sort of photography you like and where do you like to take pictures?

I like “found” images, not so keen on set-up shots. A camera is often with me when out and about, and most of my shots are taken quickly when I see something interesting. They tend to be of buildings, flowers, birds, etc, not many of people.

Heart of a Harley Eucalyptus

Q. How has the WCC changed since you joined?

The format of meetings is much the same as it always was, but the members are now a lot younger and there are more activities outside of the two main monthly meetings. Skills have also changed, mainly due to digital cameras and computers. We used to have members who specialised in B&W processing, cibachrome, slides, hand colouring etc, but now we rely on the computer. Digital photography is great, giving easy access to creativity, much better than spending hours in the darkroom!

Q. Who is your favourite photographer, why, and what is your favourite image?

I am a regular at the MGA, so get to see the works of Australian photographers and really like the B&W images of people like Olive Cotton, Max Dupain and David Moore.


Teacup Ballet – Olive Cotton


Meat Queue – Max Dupain


St Paul’s Cathedral – David Moore

One of my own favourite photos is this one of St Kilda Pier, taken not long before the building was burnt down and replaced by a similar one,

St Kilda Pier – before the fire

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